Julia St. Marie, ABR, RRG, RSPS
702-355-H.o.m.e. [4663]

Julia@LVRealEstateLady.com

CONTACT JULIA 

 Please be advised that I am not a CPA, Tax Expert, Tax Advisor or Tax Attorney.  Should you have any questions relating to the above-mentioned FIRPTA laws, please consult with the appropriate Advisors.

LVRealEstateLady

702-355-H.o.m.e. [4663]

FIRPTA
If you are a BUYER or SELLER of Real Estate Property -
Below is INFORMATION that MAY EFFECT YOU!!

FIRPTA DISCLOSURE
Foreign Investment in Real Property Tax Act of 1980

THE BELOW INFORMATION  IS TRUNATED  FROM THE IRS WEBSITE

FIRPTA Withholding
Withholding of Tax on Dispositions of United States Real Property Interests
The disposition of a U.S. real property interest by a foreign person (the transferor) is subject to the Foreign Investment in Real Property Tax Act of 1980 (FIRPTA) income tax withholding. FIRPTA authorized the United States to tax foreign persons on dispositions of U.S. real property interests. A disposition means “disposition” for any purpose of the Internal Revenue Code. This includes but is not limited to a sale or exchange, liquidation, redemption, gift, transfers, etc. Persons purchasing U.S. real property interests (transferees) from foreign persons, certain purchasers' agents, and settlement officers are required to withhold 10 percent of the amount realized on the disposition (special rules for foreign corporations). In most cases, the transferee/buyer is the withholding agent. If you are the transferee/buyer you must find out if the transferor is a foreign person. If the transferor is a foreign person and you fail to withhold, you may be held liable for the tax. For cases in which a U.S. business entity such as a corporation or partnership disposes of a U.S. real property interest, the business entity itself is the withholding agent.

Rates of Withholding
The transferee must deduct and withhold a tax equal to 10% (or other amount) of the total amount realized by the foreign person on the disposition. The amount realized is the sum of (1) The cash paid, or to be paid (principal only), (2) the fair market value of other property transferred, or to be transferred, and (3) the amount of any liability assumed by the transferee or to which the property is subject immediately before and after the transfer. The amount realized is generally the amount paid for the property. If the property transferred was owned jointly by U.S. and foreign persons, the amount realized is allocated between the transferors based on the capital contribution of each transferor.

A foreign corporation that distributes a U.S. real property interest must withhold a tax equal to 35% of the gain it recognizes on the distribution to its shareholders.

A domestic corporation must withhold a tax equal to 10% of the fair market value of the property distributed to a foreign shareholder if (1) the shareholder's interest in the corporation is a U.S. real property interest, and (2) the property distributed is either in redemption of stock or in liquidation of the corporation. 

Exceptions from FIRPTA Withholding
Generally you do not have to withhold in the following situations; however, notification requirements must be met:
1. You (the transferee) acquire the property for use as a home and the amount realized (generally sales price) is not more than $300,000. You or a member of your family must have definite plans to reside at the property for at least 50% of the number of days the property is used by any person during each of the first two 12-month periods following the date of transfer. When counting the number of days the property is used, do not count the days the property will be vacant.

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ILO THE APPRECIATION THAT LAS VEGAS HAS EXPERIENCED WITHIN THE PAST 18 MONTHS.....WE ARE FINDING THAT MORE FOREIGN OWNERS ARE SELLING THEIR LAS VEGAS INTERESTS AT THIS TIME. 
BELOW IS A SNIPP FROM THE RESIDENTIAL PURCHASE AGREEMENT THAT ADDRESSES DISCLOSURE OF FOREIGN SELLERS AND THE ESCROW INSTRUCTION TO CARRY OUT FIRPTA LAWS.